Ethnicity-related differences in inguinal canal dimensions between African and Caucasian populations and their potential impact on the mesh size for open and laparoscopic groin hernia repair in low-resource countries in Africa

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Title Ethnicity-related differences in inguinal canal dimensions between African and Caucasian populations and their potential impact on the mesh size for open and laparoscopic groin hernia repair in low-resource countries in Africa
Autor: Mitura, Kryspin; Kozieł, Sławomir; Pasierbek, Michał
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11331/3507
Date: 2018
Źródło: Videosurgery and Other Miniinvasive Techniques. Nr 1 (2018), s. 74-81
Abstract: Introduction: Access to surgery in Africa is significantly limited. Treatment outcomes in Africa differ significantly com-pared to those achieved in Europe or the US. Therefore, to popularise tension-free repair, it is essential to determine the economically justified mesh size for the African population. Aim: To conduct anthropometric evaluation of the inguinal canal in African and European patients to determine its potential consequences for the mesh size for open and laparoscopic hernia repair. Material and methods: The measurements were made in 44 adult males in Africa (group I) and were compared to measurements in 45 consecutive Caucasian males (group II). The mean age of patients was respectively 48.3 and 51.2 years. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the internal ring diameter between groups (2.2 vs. 2.1 cm; p = 0.58). The distance between the pubic tubercle and the inferomedial border of the internal inguinal ring was significantly shorter in group I (3.8 vs. 5.1 cm; p < 0.001). A similar difference was found in the length of transverse arch aponeurosis (2.9 vs. 4.0 cm; p < 0.001). The distance between the pubic tubercle and anterior superior iliac spine in group I was approximately 2 cm shorter on each side (10.0 vs. 11.8 cm; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The anatomical differences in inguinal dimensions between Central African and European populations support the potential need to adjust the standard size of synthetic mesh used for hernia repair to the needs of local populations. The significantly smaller dimensions of the inguinal canal in African males may allow the use of smaller meshes.

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Uznanie autorstwa-Użycie niekomercyjne-Na tych samych warunkach 3.0 Polska Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Uznanie autorstwa-Użycie niekomercyjne-Na tych samych warunkach 3.0 Polska

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